Green groups want 21 industries on ‘polluters list’ as EU leaders agree recovery plan

Europe’s main environmental campaign groups have written to EU leaders and key MEPs asking them to blacklist 21 industrial sectors from receiving financial support from the new post-coronavirus recovery fund. The letter came as governments were negotiating a €750 billion stimulus package with large sums earmarked for green investments but insufficient rules to ensure cash does not support polluting industries.

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Policy area

Europe’s main environmental campaign groups have written to EU leaders and key MEPs asking them to blacklist 21 industrial sectors from receiving financial support from the new post-coronavirus recovery fund. The letter came as governments were negotiating a €750 billion stimulus package with large sums earmarked for green investments but insufficient rules to ensure cash does not support polluting industries.

Transport ModeAll modesRelated issuesAir PollutionClimate Change and EnergyNoisePolicy areaInvestmentRead More

Record levels of palm oil in diesel as ‘burning food for fuel’ madness continues

The amount of palm oil used in biodiesel has risen to a record high, despite new EU rules saying it must be phased out. New data shows the amount rose to 4.5 million tonnes in 2019, an increase of 7%, which means European drivers burned 100 times more palm oil than is contained in the world’s supply of Oreo cookies. T&E says the ‘madness of burning food in cars’ must stop.

Transport Mode

Policy area

The amount of palm oil used in biodiesel has risen to a record high, despite new EU rules saying it must be phased out. New data shows the amount rose to 4.5 million tonnes in 2019, an increase of 7%, which means European drivers burned 100 times more palm oil than is contained in the world’s supply of Oreo cookies. T&E says the ‘madness of burning food in cars’ must stop.

Transport ModeFuelsRelated issuesClimate Change and EnergyPolicy areaInvestmentStandardsRead More

New tax tool calculates impact of ending aviation’s ‘nonsense’ exemption

T&E has made it easy to calculate the impact of finally making the aviation industry pay its fair share of taxes. The new tool – an emissions reduction and tax revenue calculator – shows how much emissions European countries could cut from planes and how much revenue they could raise from airline polluters. T&E says ‘the nonsense of airlines paying no tax on their fuel needs to stop.’

Transport Mode

T&E has made it easy to calculate the impact of finally making the aviation industry pay its fair share of taxes. The new tool – an emissions reduction and tax revenue calculator – shows how much emissions European countries could cut from planes and how much revenue they could raise from airline polluters. T&E says ‘the nonsense of airlines paying no tax on their fuel needs to stop.’

Transport ModeAviationRelated issuesClimate Change and EnergyPolicy areaPricing and taxationRead More

EVs three times better for environment when ride-hailing

Replacing a traditional ride-hailing car with an electric vehicle would deliver three times the environmental benefits and emission reductions, according to a new study. The finding comes as a new cost analysis by T&E shows that e-vehicles are cheaper to run for Uber drivers in many European cities, and Uber in Portugal says it will only take on new drivers if they have an EV.

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Related issues

Replacing a traditional ride-hailing car with an electric vehicle would deliver three times the environmental benefits and emission reductions, according to a new study. The finding comes as a new cost analysis by T&E shows that e-vehicles are cheaper to run for Uber drivers in many European cities, and Uber in Portugal says it will only take on new drivers if they have an EV.

Transport ModeCarsRelated issuesAir PollutionPolicy areaPricing and taxationStandardsRead More

Spanish court ruling confirms ‘clean’ gas vehicles are a myth

Spain’s highest court has ruled that gas-powered cars can be excluded from benefiting from ‘scrappage’ schemes because they are worse for the climate than diesel vehicles. The ruling comes as a new T&E report discredited claims that compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles do not pollute the air with toxic particles.

Spain’s highest court has ruled that gas-powered cars can be excluded from benefiting from ‘scrappage’ schemes because they are worse for the climate than diesel vehicles. The ruling comes as a new T&E report discredited claims that compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles do not pollute the air with toxic particles.

Transport ModeCarsFreightFuelsLorriesPublic and urbanRelated issuesAir PollutionClimate Change and EnergyPolicy areaInvestmentPricing and taxationStandardsRead More

E-truck chargers in cities key to cleaning up road freight – report

Setting ambitious targets for electric truck charging infrastructure in Europe’s cities is key to decarbonising road freight by 2050, a new T&E report shows. Lawmakers could help cut truck carbon pollution by over a fifth (22%) by 2030 by requiring the EU’s main urban centres to have chargers at distribution centres and public places.

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Policy area

Setting ambitious targets for electric truck charging infrastructure in Europe’s cities is key to decarbonising road freight by 2050, a new T&E report shows. Lawmakers could help cut truck carbon pollution by over a fifth (22%) by 2030 by requiring the EU’s main urban centres to have chargers at distribution centres and public places.

Transport ModeFreightLorriesRelated issuesClimate Change and EnergyPolicy areaInvestmentStandardsRead More

Europe commits to hydrogen for ‘hard-to-decarbonise’ sectors

Hydrogen can be a clean fuel of the future in sectors that are not suitable for electrification. That was one of the key messages from the European Commission as it published its hydrogen strategy earlier this month. T&E has given a cautious welcome to the plan, which it says rightly focuses on electrification as the key to decarbonising the economy while hydrogen offers a credible and scalable alternative to land-hungry biofuels in aviation and shipping.

Policy area

Hydrogen can be a clean fuel of the future in sectors that are not suitable for electrification. That was one of the key messages from the European Commission as it published its hydrogen strategy earlier this month. T&E has given a cautious welcome to the plan, which it says rightly focuses on electrification as the key to decarbonising the economy while hydrogen offers a credible and scalable alternative to land-hungry biofuels in aviation and shipping.

Transport ModeAviationFreightFuelsLorriesShippingRelated issuesClimate Change and EnergyPolicy areaInvestmentStandardsRead More

LOOK OUT FOR THE NEW GREEN WASTE COLLECTION MACHINE! ODS trials new electric refuse collection vehicle in Oxford

The first purpose built, fully integrated electric refuse collection vehicle built by an original equipment manufacturer in the UK will be undergoing trials in Oxford this week and can be seen working on the roads on Tuesday 21st, Wednesday 22nd and Thursday 23rd July. ODS, which manages all the waste collection for Oxford City Council and many local businesses, is leading the trial of the vehicle, and will be assessing how the vehicle performs while collecting waste from both household and business premises across the city.

The vehicle is being provided by Dennis Eagle Ltd, makers of precision-made vehicles at its specialist refuse vehicle manufacturing plant in Warwickshire. Oxford will be taking its first delivery of an electric heavy goods vehicle in January but is preparing for that moment with real-life testing this month. Maria Warner, Waste and Recycling Services Manager at ODS, said:

“We’re really excited to be testing the new all-electric refuse collection vehicle (eRCV) this month. This is a very significant investment for us and a major step forward for Oxford. ODS has 27 RCVs to cover all the homes and businesses in Oxford. When each of these is electric that will be almost 750 tonnes less CO2 pumped out by Oxford per year or the weight of one average car every day. Carbon dioxide is a green house gas, so clearly it’s important we end this as soon as possible, but diesel engines also produce nitrogen oxide which is harmful to human health. That’s why we want to start doing the right thing now – imagine when all the vehicles in the city, not just ours, are electric, what a difference this will make to air, not to mention noise pollution!”

Ms Warner explained that every waste collection round is different and puts a different strain on the vehicle, which is why it is important to test them out before taking delivery, likely to be October at the earliest, to develop the right plans and approach to work with them effectively.

Oxford has an especially dense household collection round, which will place particular demands on the vehicle battery as vehicles have to stop and start often and lift bins to empty them into the vehicle very frequently. This is followed by a relatively long drive to the recycling centre to process the waste. By contrast, the business centres which ODS looks after, such as Oxford Brookes University, require individual collections of waste which are much heavier but call for less frequent lifts.

Michele Morley from Oxford Brookes said “We’re delighted to be one of the first organisations on the collection and testing route for the new electric refuse collection vehicles, perfectly in line with Brookes’ goal to be a sector leader in energy efficient, low-carbon operations and behavioural practices. It’s very pleasing to see the many different ways ODS is applying clean technology for the benefit of the community and I look forward to learning the trial results.”

The new vehicle will have a quieter engine and lifting machinery than existing diesel trucks, and of course will have no exhaust emissions at all. Dennis Eagle’s Sales and Marketing Director Richard Taylor said: “The eCollect offers zero emissions and very quiet operation and is designed to operate in busy urban environments. We’re confident this highly efficient and cost-effective vehicle will meet Oxford’s operational needs as well as its vision for a cleaner, greener future.”

Ms Warner explained that a key reason for testing the impact of different collection rounds on the vehicle battery is to ensure that charging requirements fit in with staff working patterns:

“On our domestic collection rounds, the teams work a different shift pattern, so we need to know the charging requirements of the vehicles to be able to plan around the workforce and customer needs. This investment in electric vehicles shows how the Oxford model, where the community is considered in all business decisions, benefits the people of Oxford.”

ODS, which is wholly owned by Oxford City Council, is aiming to electrify 25% of its fleet of 339 vehicles by 2023 and is already well ahead of other companies in its facilities for electric vehicles and people who use them.

For example, it is the only licenced LEVC electric taxi service provider in the region from Bristol, south Birmingham and West London. One of its electricians, James Barrett, played a key role in developing OxPops, the world’s first ‘pop-up’ electric charging points that ODS fitted for the Council, as part of a trial on Oxford’s residential streets.

At the start of July, 32 fast 22kW chargers for electric vehicles were installed at ODS’s depot in Marsh Road, plus Oxford’s first 50kW rapid electric charger, and this is what will be used to charge the new eRCV. It was installed as part of the Energy Superhub Oxford (ESO) project, led by Oxford City Council and Pivot Power (an EDF Renewables UK company).

Councillor Nigel Chapman, Cabinet Member for Customer Focused Services, said: “This is a great example of a practical approach to tackling emissions and making sure it works for everyone in Oxford. These highly efficient vehicles are designed to be at least as cost-effective as their diesel counterparts over the course of their lifetime so we need to make sure every aspect of working with them is well planned before taking delivery of the first one. It’s good to see our front-line staff working with the very latest technology, which I know is eagerly awaited.”

Notes

ABOUT ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Carbon dioxide and cost calculations

One Euro 6 diesel engine refuse collection vehicle (RCV) generates 27 tonnes of CO2 per annum.
It has an expected life of 10 years, meaning each diesel vehicle will be producing 270 tonnes of C02 over its lifetime.
Replacing two RCVs for electric ones on this basis is the equivalent to planting 2000 trees.
One electric RCV will save approximately £10,000 per annum in fuel and £6,000 per annum in maintenance costs compared to a diesel RCV because it has far fewer parts to maintain.
Each electric RCV will, therefore, provide £300,000 savings compared to diesel in its lifetime.

Funding

ODS has taken delivery of nine electric vehicles (EVs) as part of Energy Superhub Oxford (ESO) a £41m project designed to integrate and dramatically decarbonise energy, heat and transport systems across the city.

The ESO consortium includes Oxford City Council, Pivot Power (an EDF Renewables UK company), Habitat Energy, Invinity Energy Systems (formerly RedT), Kensa Contracting and University of Oxford.

Knowledge Transfer
ODS is also part of Oxford’s vehicle-to-grid project V2GO.
This national scheme aims to evaluate the business case for using commercial EVs, the potential benefits of smart-charging technologies, and the commercial viability of vehicle-to-grid as a means of balancing electricity supply.
It will enable ODS and Oxford City Council to evaluate its existing fleet and assess its strategy for electrification based on usage, range, emissions, costs and suitable electric replacement.
This project is currently in the data gathering phase, with larger scale vehicles such as the new electric RCV fitted with tracking devices to log metrics such as mileage and dwell times.

ABOUT ODS (Oxford Direct Services)

ODS is defined as a Local Authority Trading Company (LATCo) which provides services for Oxford City Council and also operates commercially, delivering services for businesses and householders in Oxfordshire and the surrounding counties. Its mission is to be “a doing good company that’s good for everyone.”
The organisation builds homes and maintains streets, parks and properties. It constructs highways and buildings, and provides managed services. It has the largest skilled workforce in Oxfordshire including an in-house joinery and vehicle workshop which offers the only approved MOT for electric taxis for the Oxfordshire to Bristol area, and also provides waste management and pest control services.
To support these operations, ODS has developed a diverse supply chain within the area and maintains strong working relationships with clients and partners.
In its work for local authorities, businesses, schools, universities and residents ODS considers the impact of all its decisions on employees, customers, suppliers, community and the environment.

The first purpose built, fully integrated electric refuse collection vehicle built by an original equipment manufacturer in the UK will be undergoing trials in Oxford this week and can be seen working on the roads on Tuesday 21st, Wednesday 22nd and Thursday 23rd July. ODS, which manages all the waste collection for Oxford City CouncilRead More

Maritime drives distribution performance with 150 more trailers

The UK’s leading intermodal transport operator, Maritime Transport Ltd. (Maritime), has added 150 curtainsided trailers to its distribution fleet, 50 of which are currently on the road, and 100 due to be delivered in September and October. The single-deck, 13.6-metre trailers supplied by long-term partner, Lawrence David, will accommodate Maritime’s expansion efforts to meet growing demand from its increasing customer-base.

The tri-axle EN12642XL-compliant curtainsiders each featuring clearspan, pillarless roof designs comprise a variety of bespoke specifications, including a soft dock feature to mitigate loading bay damage, a load restraint system designed to securely carry both pallets and roll cages, heavy-duty flooring for increased durability, state-of-the-art tracking and a tail lift option.

Commenting on the new trailers, Stuart Wardlaw, Fleet Director at Maritime Transport, stated: ‘We have always been really pleased with the quality of Lawrence David’s products and their personal approach throughout our six-year relationship with them.’ He added: ‘The new trailers will further enable us to continue servicing our customers during these challenging times so that Britain can continue to function. We are extremely proud of our curtainsider fleet and the drivers and staff who operate them, and look forward to their integration across our depot network.’

Already the UK’s largest container transport operator, Maritime decided to diversify into the domestic distribution sector on 1st February 2011 with the purchase of 100 curtainsiders. In the nine years since, it’s distribution division has become the chosen supplier to some of the world’s largest FMCG companies experiencing exponential growth with significant contract wins even awarded during the COVID-19 pandemic. 16 of Maritime’s 33 depots are attributed to distribution, a division which sees an annualised turnover of £120m with a distribution fleet of over 300 vehicles carrying out an average of 6,000 customer deliveries per week.

‘It is a real pleasure to once again be working alongside Maritime, a company that like us is incredibly passionate about providing the best possible service to their customers utilising the best equipment,’ said Andy Dodge, Managing Director at Lawrence David. ‘We are delighted the new trailers will strengthen Maritime’s intensive operation and capacity to provide vital logistics during the pandemic, and thank them for their loyalty.’

The UK’s leading intermodal transport operator, Maritime Transport Ltd. (Maritime), has added 150 curtainsided trailers to its distribution fleet, 50 of which are currently on the road, and 100 due to be delivered in September and October. The single-deck, 13.6-metre trailers supplied by long-term partner, Lawrence David, will accommodate Maritime’s expansion efforts to meet growingRead More

Lucketts go the distance with TruTac’s compliance software

Lucketts Travel, based on the south coast and part of National Express, have been using TruTac compliance control software for over 10 years and in recent times, TruTac’s TruLinks API suite has enabled the company to automatically integrate verified vehicle and driver tachograph data direct into other systems.

For example, the powerful vehicle distance data is used in systems such as planning maintenance schedules, fuel usage and vehicle utilisation. Live, verified data is vital for reports and critical business decisions. TruLinks allows Lucketts to access key data and removes the need for manual intervention or data duplication.

In ‘normal times’ with 160 coaches operating throughout Europe on day-trips, holiday breaks and corporate services, Lucketts are presented with the challenge of keeping tabs on every journey distance and start/stop time – not only to monitor drivers’ working hours for payroll purposes but also to keep in line with EU drivers hours regulations.

“Like any operation of our size and type” says Lucketts’ Group Managing Director, Tony Lawman, “there is a host of data to be gathered, analysed and acted upon. Using TruTac’s TruControl software, including the TruLinks module, this is all made possible. For example, we integrate all vehicle and driver information into our vehicle management system to monitor each driver’s hours and calculate their wages.”

Tony goes on to say that every time a driver reads their card, the cloud-based system sends instant start and stop data into Lucketts’ automated payroll, and the process couldn’t be faster or more accurate.

Also, for enhanced control over driver and vehicle activities and as part of TruTac’s TruControl analysis and reporting system, an Unknown Drivers Report feature enables vehicle operators to set a distance and time, so they can see ‘unknown’ drivers who fall within those parameters. This provides a simpler way of filtering out depot or other unrecorded movements of coaches and makes data more relevant.

Lucketts were the first coach operator to attain the highly coveted DVSA ER (Earned Recognition) status and has founder member status along with being a top Blue Zero-rated participant.

“ER was a key reason we embarked on our more in-depth compliance journey” reflects Tony, “and along the way TruTac’s flexible and innovative approach to co-developing products for our operation – to the point where TruTac’s system literally feeds our business intelligence – has enabled us to routinely produce comprehensive DVSA reports on a fortnightly basis. Before TruTac, this would not have been possible.”

Lucketts not only work with technology leaders but they bring them together to provide bespoke solutions for their business. For example, TruTac work with Distinctive Systems, the PSV software specialists, to process verified tacho data from TruTac’s system, via TruLinks to maximise intelligent data sharing and for example, to improve maintenance planning.

“On top of the current measures required to combat Covid-19, there are many crucial aspects to maintaining compliance control and keeping on top of the daily details which can so easily determine your success or otherwise.” Concludes Tony Lawman. “TruTac software has provided us with a core functionality and regarding time and distance they now represent a single source of verification.”

Among their numerous accreditations, Lucketts Travel are widely recognised as exemplars within the PSV industry and as a member of both the Guild of British Coach Operators and the Confederation of Passenger Transport they are one of the first companies to be awarded with the elite Coach Marque status.

Lucketts Travel, based on the south coast and part of National Express, have been using TruTac compliance control software for over 10 years and in recent times, TruTac’s TruLinks API suite has enabled the company to automatically integrate verified vehicle and driver tachograph data direct into other systems. For example, the powerful vehicle distance dataRead More

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